Monday, March 12, 2012

Do You Think She'll Float?

I hope I don't try the reader's patience by showing a few more photos of the boat. I told my son Ben I would update him on the status of the Bonnie J when he called today. As you can see, the original plan to replace the bow stem and a few planks, has grown into a monumental project that would make Noah nod in appreciation. While I was aware that some serious work needed to be done, I had no idea the damage was as extensive as it is. John told me yesterday that we had to stop taking planks off- there was just not enough time or materials to do all that needs done. I have some serious work that needs done on several planks that are amidships, but it just can't be dealt with at this time, so I'll have to try and dry out the planks and resort to the old standby, Bondo, a body filler that they use in cars after they've been in a wreck or start rusting out. You can see the contrast in the color of the wood planks versus the bow stem. The planks are yellow cedar and the stem is Douglas Fir. I wish I  had a trailer full of that fir- it's beautiful and tougher than the cedar. It is what it is though. Because we live in a small town where entertainment is at a premium, an event like  having your boat hauled out and re-planked is a major attraction. Yesterday, multitudes of vehicles drove by to inspect the handi-work. I've heard from a number of people just how lucky I am to have John Kveum doing the work. It's obvious that he's a pro and he enjoys what he's doing. We both wish he could make a living at it. Unfortunately, working on boats is kind of like the fishing- on years when the fishermen make money they can afford to have the work done. In lean years the fishermen and the shipwrights starve. It's unfortunate though. I'm afraid that one day us wooden boat owners won't be able to find anyone competent and qualified to do the work. Hopefully I'll be done fishing by then.

5 comments:

  1. Hey Dad that is looking great. I'm glad you were able to accomplish that. That's still an excessive amount of work that you are getting done. I can't wait to see the boat. Take care Dad. Brian

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  2. Looking good so far, I'm glad that John is down there! However, when I get down, I'll be making my own wooden boat that would rival Noah's...sooooo...

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  3. Thanks Brian- I do wish I could have stayed on top of it better down through the years, but there was always something else vying for attention- plus John wasn't doing too much boat work for awhile. I'll do what I can now and hope that the season will allow more work next year.
    Well Autumn, a boat made out of toothpicks and splinters will take a huge amount of glue sooo... you better have about 500 years to work on it sooo...my boat will still be better than yours sooo...I have a fifty ton license and you don't sooo... take that!

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  4. Well, technically I was going to make it out of Balsa wood...soo...lighter than air...sooo. And, I don't need glue, I'll use my own spit to keep it together...pretty magical like that...sooo. And, I have a whale licence, little better than yours...sooo...

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  5. I'm just going to build a raft out of toothpicks...sooo..it'll only take me 200 years...sooo...and I'll take your stash of Trident and make it all stick together...soooo...maybe you could start saving your already chewed gum so I don't get lock jaw...Boat's lookin great dad! Love ya! AJ

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